The science of critical speed, critical velocity (CV), and critical power training for runners

Female athlete running in front of scientific graphic paper

Critical speed is the boundary that separates running speeds that can be sustained at a metabolic steady-state from speeds that cannot. Sometimes called critical velocity or “CV,” critical speed is known in the running world in partly due to its popularization by Tom “Tinman” Schwartz and his proteges, including Drew Hunter.[1]

Critical speed is increasingly becoming the gold standard among physiologists for identifying the limit of what runners would call “high-end aerobic” or “steady-state” running speeds, and is gaining traction as a training tool as well. The critical speed model explains the body’s response to different speeds better than older models based on the lactate threshold.

Among exercise physiologists, critical speed (or a semi-related concept, the maximum lactate steady state, which we’ll also discuss) is rapidly becoming the gold standard for capturing the aerobic fitness of athletes.

Critical speed has its roots in early work in the 1960s, 70s, and 80s, but didn’t really start to emerge as the strongest physiological model for intense exercise until the last 15 years or so.

In this article, we’ll take a detailed look at the critical speed phenomenon, understand how it works on a mathematical and physiological level, see some of the problems and controversies surrounding it, and learn how to apply the concept of critical speed in your own training.

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